Programs

In today's prison system, very few vocational trades and educational classes are offered for the incarcerated. There are 49 major institutions in Florida, and only a handful of institutions have more than one vocational trade. There are even institutions that do not have a single trade to offer their inmate population.

In today's prison system, very few vocational trades and educational classes are offered for the incarcerated. There are 49 major institutions in Florida, and only a handful of institutions have more than one vocational trade. There are even institutions that do not have a single trade to offer their inmate population.

When you look at the minimum amount of the trades that FDC offers close to 100,000inmates, one cannot help but understand how the inmate population is disenfranchised.The average institution only has one trade with an average capacity of 15-20 inmates per class, the percentage of inmates that profit off of a vocational trade equates to about 20students out of approximately 1,200 inmates per institution, which is a percentage of 1.6per institution.

The issue is multi-layered as different factors create this anemic situation. The layers consist of:

1.) Administrative restrictions
2.) Limited FDC funding
3.) Teacher availability
4.) Incentive to participate
5.) Perceived security and movement concerns6.) Unused qualified inmate facilitators

A handful of institutions have multiple programs, but those are very few in the overall scheme of vocational training. For example, an institution like Avon Park CI (it has marine mechanics, welding, cabinetry, printing, wastewater treatment, and two PRIDE facilities),which affects roughly 200 inmates. This would mean that out of a population of a thousand inmates, only about 20% participate in some type of trade advancement curriculum. Sadly, these institutions are the exception, and by no means the rule.

Society-First seeks to be a platform to advocate for reform and to aid men and women in making a positive transition back into society. We are looking for solutions that will greatly reduce recidivism while helping society embrace its returning citizens.

We invite those who have been affected by this epidemic, whether an ex-offender, inmate, family member, victim, church, correctional officer, or simply a citizen to share their personal experience, solutions, or questions concerning all aspects of the criminal justice system.

More Problems

11

Volunteers

The need for those in prison to receive as much help as they can to change is a need that will require many volunteers to be able to add to these offenders' lives. A requirement that is sorely lacking in Florida's prison system and just like almost everything about the prison system, it is set up to fail in this area.

12

Re-entry

Many times, the reality of re-entry sets up those who are about to be released for failure, which ultimately, sets up society for failure. Somewhere our system quit safeguarding its society by failing to rehabilitate and releasing ex-offenders who are not prepared to succeed.

5

Use of Force

In today's prison system, there is a real issue with unnecessary uses of force and Society-First seeks to identify the common denominators to this unacceptable practice. We seek to shine a light on why these abuses are so common and why there is a lack of accountability.